Twitter for project managers (4 of 4)

The first 3 parts were about Twitter, it’s conventions and how to find and share information. This final post in the series, Part 4, suggests how to use Twitter for a project

Please add your ideas and comments if you are a #pmot (project manager on Twitter). What works for you?
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Twitter for project managers (3 of 4)

Parts 1 and 2 were about Twitter and it’s conventions, Part 3 suggests how to find useful information and collaborate on Twitter
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Twitter for project managers (2 of 4)

Part 1 was about Twitter, Part 2 is about the habits and traditions Twitter users have.

Twitter was started by some friends who wanted to tell each other what was happening. As others joined, habits and traditions started.
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Twitter for project managers

Another mini series of blogs on a topic for project managers – enjoy the four parter on Twitter

Social Media has grown. Facebook is the communication method of choice for some groups of people. Foursquare tells you where people often are. Some counties or age groups use it a lot, for others it is only common in some sectors. Twitter.com carries the news from the spot as it happens and commentary from conferences and events in just 140 characters.

To get the best from Twitter you need to build a network of contacts to “follow”. These are people or organisations who give you useful information or who you hold online conversations. There are also tools that will tell you what the world or your part of it are posting about (tweeting) by looking at these trending topics, you may discover others who tweet the sorts of things that interest you.

In your main Twitter account settings, you have a choice to make your account private. That means you can choose if you allow others to follow you and see your posts. I am not convinced of the practical use of these. While Twitter has a pretty good record of defending it’s data, nothing you post onto a public site, even behind a privacy wall, is truly private any longer. I compare it to having a changing room in a big store that has salon doors – there is some protection of your modesty but it is not truly private.

Communicating with the world

Some projects simply need more publicity than others. With budgets being squeezed what can you do to get the message out?

Social Medial might help but recognise that, like any tool, it has its limitations and risks. A social media trend (in old media it might have been called a buzz) can be created by more than one person posting contributions about a particular key word. That means like every other part of your project, you’ll need to plan and co-ordinate the work. Read more of this post